Categories
Emotional Revolution

Empathy is the opposite of Utopia

Illuminating animated lecture by Jeremy Rifkin on The Empathic Civilisation

Categories
Creative Life Stories

Some kind of life (1)

Twenty-three steps. This was the number he had to go up to get to his office on the second floor of a three-storey building on Brussels’ expensive Avenue Louise. There, his personal assistant always waited for his arrival in the morning at 8.30 am to brief him on the day’s agenda and remind him of the most important commitments of the week. His PA’s name was Jean-Marc. Efficient. Handsome. Young. Single. French.

Forty-three years. This was his age, not Jean-Marc’s, Michael’s. Black hair. Grey eyes. Handsome. Intelligent. Ambitious. Rational sometimes. Emotional often. Bored easily. Married. Two daughters. British father. Italian mother.

Fifteen as a corporate lawyer. He was good at his job. Clients appreciated his work with expensive fees and gifts. He gave them back one of the best lawyers in European competition law the European education system can get. That is why he could afford having his own firm. Alone, against the Baker & McKenzies or the Freshfields, Bruckhaus, Deringers that populated the trade. Big law firms with dozens of lawyers. He, only him.

Seven days a week. If Michael would have been just a lawyer during all this time, he would have probably killed himself. He had not. Nothing of the sort. He had another life besides being one more puppet of the multinational legal system in which he navigated in his dull life. A life that provided him with the thrill he needed to keep his body and mind on this earth. A second life that was going to change his first life forever.

***

Categories
Stories

Some kind of life (1)

Twenty-three steps. This was the number he had to go up to get to his office on the second floor of a three-storey building on Brussels’ expensive Avenue Louise. There, his personal assistant always waited for his arrival in the morning at 8.30 am to brief him on the day’s agenda and remind him of the most important commitments of the week. His PA’s name was Jean-Marc. Efficient. Handsome. Young. Single. French.

Forty-three years. This was his age, not Jean-Marc’s, Michael’s. Black hair. Grey eyes. Handsome. Intelligent. Ambitious. Rational sometimes. Emotional often. Bored easily. Married. Two daughters. British father. Italian mother.

Fifteen as a corporate lawyer. He was good at his job. Clients appreciated his work with expensive fees and gifts. He gave them back one of the best lawyers in European competition law the European education system can get. That is why he could afford having his own firm. Alone, against the Baker & McKenzies or the Freshfields, Bruckhaus, Deringers that populated the trade. Big law firms with dozens of lawyers. He, only him.

Seven days a week. If Michael would have been just a lawyer during all this time, he would have probably killed himself. He had not. Nothing of the sort. He had another life besides being one more puppet of the multinational legal system in which he navigated in his dull life. A life that provided him with the thrill he needed to keep his body and mind on this earth. A second life that was going to change his first life forever.

***

Categories
Information Network World Networks

The bunker and the train station

What does someone do in a bunker? And in a train station? The answer seems quite straightforward. The bunker guy protects himself, the station guy buys a ticket and catches a train. But they are also doing something else more relevant to the transformations that the new information environment is making possible.

The people in the bunker are isolated from the world. Their primordial value is security. They want to protect themselves and their property. In principle, they have everything they need inside the bunker. Whenever they need something else they know where to get it. They quickly get out of the bunker, go to the predetermined place, get what they need and go back straight after. All the information they get is contained in the bunker, and in the few trips to their “trusted sources”. They live in a self-inflicted closed information environment, with nearly zero occurrence of serendipity.

And at the train station?

The people in the train station are in a public space. Their objetives are normally straightforward: buy a ticket or/and catch a train, but to perform these tasks they enter in an open, not -controlled environment in which they may find themselves doing something unexpected (i.e. by serendipity) e.g. buying a bag in a shop at the station, meeting a friend that offers them a new job, meeting their future spouse or a brief passionate affair. A train station, as any other public space, is an open information environment, in which safety and control are not primordial values, but sharing is. The shop has to put a big sign and front window to announce their products, the people at the information centre offer you the necessary information for your trip and even beyond, a stranger may give you directions to the nearest exit, metro station or restroom.

This analogy describes two opposed information environments: closed and open. Each of them has benefits and costs. Closed environments are safe, but not creative. For they don’t allow for the unexpected, the unplanned to happen. Open environments may be hazardous if we’re in them completely unprotected – think of the small kid in a train station alone -, but they give opportunity to new, surprising and innovative things to emerge.

When things are stable and not connected. A closed environment can be the solution. Too much openness can be unproductive when one needs standardised procedures and behaviour for things to work. But when the world is in transformation and increasingly more connected, openness is not only beneficial, but perhaps the only way to survive. For new solutions, new ways of looking at the things, the fast integration of different perspectives become advantages in front of those that do not change and are closed to new ways of thinking.

So now think of the bunker as bureaucracies, and the train station as networks. Two different ways of organising our activities to produce useful things for all of us. Which one is more ready for the world that’s coming?

Categories
me

Presenting Raw A.

This is my personal blog. It started as a semi-professional space, for my ideas on a series of topics in which I worked on. But during the latest months it has become more personal, mixing life events with more theoretical/practical ideas. Now I feel I need a different space for my thoughts and my stories. One that is not cluttered with widgets or other gimmicks, which are good for this blog, but not for a pure space with just what comes from my mind.

Simple. White. One column. No tag clouds. No pages. No calendar. No nothing. A new clear space for my thoughts and the stories I write. There I rant about topics I find interesting. There I can tell my stories. Nothing about my (personal or professional) life. Just thoughts and fiction. It’s raw A.

NOTE: all posts published on Raw A. will be automatically published on this blog.

Categories
Stories

What’s gone

Dawn far over the sea. Walking next to the beach. His thoughts were lost in a myriad of things. The night was precious. His memories will keep it for ever. Friends, music, sensations and her. Dancing crazily with someone he won’t probably see again, but who has marked him well deep in his soul. His house approaching, while his feet are dragging his body unwillingly. Each step is one step away from that heaven he just was gone from. “I won’t forget”. Blessing and curse. Chasing what’s gone it’s futile.

Categories
Facebook Songs

Hold on to people, they’re slipping away

Open to everything happy and sad
Seeing the good when it’s all going bad
Seeing the sun when I can’t really see
Hoping the sun will at least look at me

[audio:http://aribo.eu/wp-content/audio/slippingaway.mp3]

Slipping Away, Moby

Categories
Información Mundo en Red Política

Apuntes sobre el acceso a la información. Hechos sin acceso.

UPDATE: Un artículo de EuropaPress contiene más información que el artículo de El País (gracias a @netoraton.
UPDATE2: Comunicado de prensa sobre estas noticias de AccessInfo, la organización que trabaja por el reconocimiento de este derecho en España dentro de la Coalición ProAcceso.

Hoy El País avanza una vez más una miguitas de lo que podría ser la Ley de Acceso a la Información española. El proceso de elaboración de esta ley ha sido a puerta cerrada, en secreto, sin la participación ciudadana, sólo de agentes desconocidos de las administraciones públicas. Un proceso que contradice el espíritu de esta ley, y que en cierta manera desvela la verdadera voluntad del gobierno en aplicar una ley que cambiara la manera en el que las administraciones españolas trataran al ciudadano.

El País avanza tres puntos importantes: (1) plazo de 30 dias para contestar (con posibilidad de ampliación a 30 días más en casos de dificultad en conseguir la información); (2) Silencio administrativo positivo. Si la administración afectada no contesta en el plazo legal se resuelve en favor del peticionario; (3) la Agencia Española de Protección de Datos (con el añadido de “y Acceso a la Información) será la encargada de los recursos contra la decisión de la administración, aunque sólo en el caso de la administración estatal, pues no tiene competencias sobre la administración autonómica.

Tres apuntes personales sobre estos tres puntos: (1) 30 días es un plazo bastante amplio en comparación con la media en Europa, que es de alrededor de 14 días. Además se puede ampliar a 30 días más. Dos meses pueden ser una eternidad dependiendo de la perennidad de la información requerida. (2) El cambio del efecto del silencio administrativo es muy positivo. Actualmente la mayoría de las peticiones de información se resuelven en negativo con el silencio de la administración. (3) El dar las competencias a la AEPD es un modelo que puede funcionar bien, como los casos británico y esloveno demuestran. Pero ¿Qué pasa con las administraciones autonómicas y locales? Esto significa que en cierta manera estamos hablando de una ley de bases, pues el acceso a la información de las administraciones autonómicas es competencia de éstas, al menos su aplicación. Necesitaremos entonces de leyes autonómicas que garanticen el ejercicio del derecho de acceso a la información.

Este último punto nos vuelve a una cuestión fundamental: ¿regulará el gobierno este derecho como un derecho fundamental recogido en el artículo de la Constitución (art. 20) o como un derecho recogido en la Constitución (art. 105), pero sin las garantías de los fundamentales? Respuesta en el próximo capítulo de “Acceso y Secretos: Una saga a la española”, escrito por el Gobierno y sus amiguetes. Publicado por El País.

Más info (por AccessInfo)

Categories
me

Amnesic rhythmic memories from the beats of the past

I remember the drums, the beats and the feet. Bodies touching. Hands raising. Down, Up. Beat up, beat down. Louder and louder. Hips left and right. The floor full of those whom the night calls every day, at every sun. Moon-dominated souls that want to live what’s not allowed in the waking lights. Amnesic mind blowing experience. Drugs or not. Changing lives by the contact with the other. The unknown looking at you. Luring you to the depths of the dark. There, where the wolves wait your coming to make you theirs. There, where the bat sucks your blood. There, where the fairies bring you pleasures unattainable in the clarity of the day.

Categories
Songs

First it gets hot then cold in the end it hurts

Die Liebe ist ein wildes Tier
Sie atmet dich sie sucht nach dir
Nistet auf gebrochenen Herzen
Geht auf Jagd bei Kuss und Kerzen
Saugt sich fest an deinen Lippen
Gräbt sich Gänge durch die Rippen
Lässt sich fallen weich wie Schnee
Erst wird es heiß dann kalt am Ende tut es weh

[audio:http://www.aribo.eu/wp-content/audio/amour.mp3]
Amour, Rammstein